How to Make Your Own Commercial for the “Big Game”

By Brian Cox, President and CEO, Flick Fusion

In 2019, advertisers paid over $5 million for a 30-second commercial ad spot during the Super Bowl. That kind of budget is out of reach for dealerships, but that doesn’t mean you can’t create your own commercial for the big game.

TV ads that run during the Super Bowl can be funny or heart-wrenching. They can be warm and sweet, or edgy and trendy. A good Super Bowl ad captures and conveys the essence of a brand in 30 seconds.

For weeks leading up to the Super Bowl, everyone wants to know which companies are advertising and what type of commercial they’ll come up with. Some commercials are leaked as teasers and even the news media contributes to the hype. Super Bowl advertisers probably get just as much public relations value out of running an ad during the game, than they do from the actual ad itself.

Why not cash in on this buzz and create your dealership’s very own “big game” commercial? All it takes is some creativity and a camera.

Of course, your commercial won’t actually run on TV during the Super Bowl. Instead, you can distribute it across every digital channel for maximum exposure. Post it on your website. Use it in email marketing and digital ad campaigns. Post it on all your social media channels. Use a shortened version as a pre-roll ad on YouTube.

Promote the heck out of it. Maybe it will go viral. Have some fun with it.

According to a National Retail Federation Study, 73% of Super Bowl viewers see the ads as entertainment. That’s the power of video. If you make your own “big game” commercial, everyone will want to see it. Just make sure that your ad is actually entertaining.

Here are a few tips on what makes a great commercial.

Tell a Story. Most Super Bowl ads don’t try to advertise a sale or special. The most successful ads tell a story that’s designed to elicit an emotion from the viewer. Buying a car can be an emotional experience, so try tapping into your customers’ experience, whether that’s happy, sentimental or exasperated.

Keep it Simple. What’s your brand’s unique value proposition? Don’t try to be everything to everybody. Use simple concepts and headlines. Don’t let complexity get in the way of your message. An effective ad conveys one message that is clear to the audience.

Brand Recall. Sometimes companies do such a great job at being cute or funny, that the viewers love the commercial but they don’t recall the brand. What’s the point of that? To be effective, an ad needs to accurately reflect your brand identity, and viewers should remember the brand.

Originality. If your ad looks like everyone else’s ads, it won’t be memorable. Spend some time coming up with a truly unique concept. Think outside the box. Even if your ad falls short of being award-worthy, your viewers will give you an “A” for effort.

Tap into a Trend. The auto industry is changing. Peruse news headlines and think about what people are talking about: autonomous vehicles, advanced vehicle technology, ride-sharing, electric vehicles and buying cars from vending machines. Try to leverage these trends in your ads, whether it’s poking fun or promoting interactions with an actual human.

Don’t Use Trademarked Terms. The terms “Super Bowl” and “Super Sunday” are trademarked by the NFL, so they can’t be used to promote your business in an ad, or the NFL will send a cease and desist letter. Use terms like “Big Game” or incorporate a football theme without mentioning any specifics. Also avoid using names of specific teams and players.

Be Honest. Most of all, make sure that your dealership delivers on your ad’s promise.

Once your ad is produced, it’s time to kick back, grab some wings and watch as the number of video views goes up and up. And don’t forget to enjoy the game!

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